Heat stress is a serious problem!

Here we see a very light, open barn, with a big problem: it's too hot! You see the cows are all grouping together to find the coolest place.

The message is clear: watch out for heat stress! Cows like 5 - 15 degrees Celcius.
What we can do here is either improve the ventilation or reduce the sunlight coming in.

What else can we do? You're thoughts are very welcome.

Video made by UK CowSignals trainer Piers Pepperell

Comments (23)

Helen Thoday

Thanks Piers, what a great visual. Thanks for sharing. We are looking at ventilation requirements in New Zealand at the moment, so very topical.

Steffen Elmer

Build the stables narrow max 4 rows and keep the triple distance of the width of the stable.

In old stables we need to push fresh air into the stables with the ventilators

Erik Lindeboom, ID Agro

for sure too hot! An integrated shade Material or add on would help a lot. Cut bushes and open the ridge....

Mohammad Alkhateeb

Installing cooling fans with sprinklers taking in consideration humidity is a good solution for this barn.

Antun Brkic

We had similar problem on farm, and we put sun blocking green nets on the roof. Roof was also light, made of PP material. But, before snow we have to remove nets because they keep snow on the roof, which is dangerous because of roof collapsing.

Antun Brkic

Something like these..

http://pseno.hr/wp-content/gallery/mreze-za-zasjenjivanje/mre%C5%BEe-za-zasjenjivanje-001.jpg

halbe

I saw the same problem at one of my clients farm. The barn is too large and in the middle there is hardly any ventilation. We talked about installing ventilators but I do not know much about it. Can you give me some advice.

Anny

there is an old en elegant solution for this: a green pasture with the shade of trees :)

Philip Ashwin

Ventilation is important year round although most visually evident on hot days.
Ridge exhaust is important for year round ventilation in this type of building.
Circulation fans are likely required on this wide a building.
HVLS fans would be our choice for this facility in England to address the cow comfort on the warmer days, these fans have been very successful worldwide in addressing this type of issue.

Joep Driessen

Thank you all for valuable feedback! Let's keep this discussion going, together we all know more!

M

the problem of heat stress is a major part when the cows are grazing in
summer time, this needs to build sheds on the field.

Joep Driessen

halbe wrote:
I saw the same problem at one of my clients farm. The barn is too large and in the middle there is hardly any ventilation. We talked about installing ventilators but I do not know much about it. Can you give me some advice.

Hi Halbe,

If you like some more advice, please contact Bertjan Westerlaan and/or Nico Vreeburg form Vetvice barn design. I'm sure they can help you out!

Bertjan: Tel: +31-(0)6-27454662, E-mail: westerlaan@vetvice.nl
Nico: Tel: +31-(0)6-51834396 , E-mail: vreeburg@vetvice.nl

Diego Thielen Carbonell

One way to lower temperature in to install a sprinkler system on top of the roof, the water will evaporate lowering the roof temperature in about 5 degrees, this complemented with a Ridge exhaust should do the trick, if it is still hot try installing the sun blocking green nets but do it inside the barn underneath the roof, in a curtain system that you can control the sunlight coming in and gather in during winter.

George Thole

I reckon you should open and raise the top center so as to allow air coming from the open ends to exit while taking the heat from inside out. A other small roof raised one meter at the center will do the trick and stop rain water coming in. Running water from the top of the roof from both sides will cool the roof and aid cool air sweeping from inside the shed thereby cooling the cows.

Hamish McMillan

Design is key - width to utilise natural airflow, shade cloth to block the sun and false ceilings to maintain airflow at cow height plus some convection to enhance airflow. Can generate temperature drops under clear roofs using these concepts.

Drs.P

First put the ventilationscreens all the way down. Secund put two horizontal ventilators in the middle to move the air around. Third feed some bicarbonate. Fourth above the boxes make some sunscreens (to hold the direct sunlight away). Fifth if you design a stabble like this make sure that you have a thriple layer air between the seperated polycarbonate plates. Sixth i would start with a opening at the top the so called T rooftop. At least 30-40cm wide. With that you can make some lift in the plates of 5-10cm over the the whole lenght of the rofe at the back end of the plates ( the lower point). The air is popping out.

adam

close the doors on end walls and put big ash fans in the barn

Larry Chase

Install fans and sprinklers! They should help. A key area is to provide cooling in the holding area as cows wait to go in the parlor. They are very crowded and heat stress can be bad. Payback on investment is often ,

Danny

I just curios when the cows all grouping together, the microenviroment temperature will raise by their body temperature , the situation will become worse.

halbe

Danny wrote:
I just curios when the cows all grouping together, the microenviroment temperature will raise by their body temperature , the situation will become worse.

Yes it is quiet remarkeble that cows stick together when it's hot. In the field you see the same behaviour: when it's cool the cows are laying dispersed in the field, when it's hot they stick together often near the water trough.

Nathan Stewart

Helen Thoday wrote:
Thanks Piers, what a great visual. Thanks for sharing. We are looking at ventilation requirements in New Zealand at the moment, so very topical.

Hello Helen, we are going to be launching a new cow barn design that will eliminate all the problems we have in NZ with air flow in the next 6 months

Anouk Brinkhoff

I see good comments keep coming in. Great!

Rob Davies

Hi Piers
We have a very similar problem to this here in west Wales. The climate here is very similar to yours in Somerset. The high humidity is also a problem, not just the heat, so we have to be careful where we place sprinklers if we chose to use them at all. I find Cyclone fans, fans enclosed within a plastic casing with louvres to direct the air flow towards the cows, very efficient at creating what we call effective cowside air velocity. Place these over holding areas and over the cubicle beds in order to attract the cows to where we want them to spend their time. We also place them in the close to calving dry cow sheds.
Did you see a drop in milk yield/milk solids yield &/or conception rates at this time?

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